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Qore Performance, inventors of the IcePlate hard cell cooling and hydration solution, is proud to announce the release of the Enhanced Dealer Program in partnership with SOARescue who is now the Subject Matter Expert for all Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications for the IcePlate. In this role, SOARescue will be spearheading the already rapid growth of IcePlate into Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications where end users are in need of a powerful, portable rehab solution. The expansion of IcePlate applications beyond military and law enforcement has been a vision of SOARescue for some time.

Qore Performance announces Enhanced Dealer Program with launch partner SOARescue

Qore Performance announces Enhanced Dealer Program with launch partner SOARescueQore Performance, inventors of the IcePlate hard cell cooling and hydration solution, is proud to announce the release of the Enhanced Dealer Program in partnership with SOARescue who is now the Subject Matter Expert for all Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications for the IcePlate. In this role, SOARescue will be spearheading the already rapid growth of IcePlate into Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications where end users are in need of a powerful, portable rehab solution. The expansion of IcePlate applications beyond military and law enforcement has been a vision of SOARescue for some time. “Environmental injury prevention and mitigation is often overlooked in our community. This has partially been due to inadequate equipment and education on the subject. We are incredibly excited about this partnership with Qore Performance, and the opportunity to close a capability gap” says Andrew Rowley, CEO of SOARescue. The IcePlate will be able to be utilized in many facets of Fire/Rescue and Tactical EMS operations. “We foresee this being an incredible tool in firefighter rehabilitation after a working fire or prolonged extrication. This tool will be utilized under technical rescue gear keeping rescuers cool or warm regardless of the environmental condition(s). The multifunctional design of this amazing device will also allow for tactical medics and operators alike to remain cool and hydrated on extended operations, enhancing their own safety and performance in the process, without expanding the footprint of their kit,” concluded Rowley. The key to packing all of this capability into small, deployable spaces is the combination of IcePlates and Pelican Coolers. The IcePlate is geometrically optimized for Pelican Coolers and delivers 30% greater storage density over bottled water. SOARescue will use this unique and groundbreaking IcePlate capability to help Fire Rescue EMS personnel bring more relief in less space – an efficiency that will make a difference on rigs already loaded with kit. Additionally, SOARescue is the first Authorized Service Center for IcePlate. As an IcePlate ASC, SOARescue will be able to offer current IcePlate customers the ability to retrofit their existing IcePlates with Qore Performance’s cross-compatible Quick Disconnect, which allows users to connect their existing Source Hydration hoses and some CamelBak hoses to their IcePlate. “We are excited about our partnership with SOARescue. They are the type of visionary, high-quality, high character subject matter experts with whom we love to partner,” says Justin Li, Inventor & Owner of Qore Performance, “we couldn’t ask for a better launch partner for our "Enhanced Dealer Program" .” The Enhanced Dealer Program capabilities are available from SOARescue immediately. SOARescue stocks IcePlate in all colors and combinations (White/Clear, Desert Tan and Wolf Grey, with or without the cross-compatible Quick Disconnect). If you are in the Fire Rescue EMS space and are interested in finding out how SOARescue can build an IcePlate program for your department, contact: IcePlate@SOARescue.com , visit www.SOARescue.com , or call 1-855-4-SOARESQ and use option 2. Qore Performance IcePlate Fire/Rescue EMS Rehab by SOARescue Full IcePlate Product Line

Different Ammo in the Same GunKaboom?

Different Ammo in the Same GunKaboom?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Your revolver is a .357 magnum, but people say it shoots .38 special. Your new AR-15 says it can shoot 5.56x45mm NATO, but your friends say just pick up a box of .223. What’s going on here? Has the world turned upside down?  Don’t they realize that we’re dealing with BULLETS here? Have a cup of tea. Let’s talk. It’s possible that a firearm chambered for one round can safely fire another.  There could be any number of reasons for this.  Some guns, like the Taurus Judge, are designed to do that, and with some, it’s just a happy coincidence. Common Examples The best example of this is the .357 magnum revolver.  You see, back in the long-long-ago, the 1930s, police officers were issued .38 special revolvers as their sidearms.  About this time, bullet-proof vests were just coming into being and gangsters were using their car doors as cover during shoot-outs. Speed Loader for 5-shot .38 on left; Tuff Strip for .357 Mag on right Well, .38 special couldn’t pierce body armor and it wouldn’t go through car doors, so police departments looked for a solution.  Smith & Wesson provided one in a new round that used a standard .38 special bullet but with a lot more power behind it.  It was dubbed the .357 magnum. Editor's Choice Smith & Wesson Model 686+ 729 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 729 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing The bullets have the same diameter, but the .357 could punch through the new body armor that was showing up on the streets. As mentioned, the .357 magnum has a lot more power, which means more pressure.  Regular .38 special revolvers couldn’t handle the pressure, which meant that .357 magnum revolvers made specifically to handle the load had to be developed. As an added safety precaution the length of the .357 magnum case was extended by 1/8 of an inch.  This way, a person couldn’t load and close a .38 special revolver with .357 magnum ammunition and accidentally blow themselves up. But because the diameter of both bullets are the same and the pressure in a .38 special is less than that of a .357 magnum, a .38 special round can be safely fired in a .357 magnum revolver or lever gun. So to sum up in one sentence: You can shoot .38 special in .357 magnum guns, but you can’t shoot .357 magnum in .38 special guns.  Got it? If you want to learn more and get some great ammo recommendations, read our Best .38 Spl & .357 Mag Ammo article. Under Pressure Pressure is the big determining factor because a firearm rated for one kind of ammunition may have features beyond safety designed specifically for that round. For instance, according to Patrick Sweeney at Rifle Shooter Magazine , the 5.56x45mm and the .223 look the same, but the 5.56 is loaded for a higher pressure to increase velocity. Chambers that are designed specifically for .223 have a narrower leade (the unrifled portion of the chamber ahead of the rifling) and a steeper angle of rifling.  This is because the .223 was designed primarily for accuracy. The 5.56 was designed to deliver more power and reliability, so the leade is wider and longer to allow more build-up of crud and a more gentle angle of rifling to accommodate the power of the 5.56. Common Bullet Sizes Sweeney said the end result is that you can safely fire a .223 in a 5.56 chamber, but there are risks when firing a 5.56 in a .223 chamber.  He also recommends that even if your AR15 says 5.56 and .223, you should check it for yourself with a leade/throat gauge. Some manufacturers use .223 barrels because they’re more accurate but they stamp their rifles as 5.56 and .223. Personally, I’ve never seen/heard of this happening nor have I have ever double-checked a barrel that came from a respectable manufacturer. What about .308 and 7.62x51mm? There’s a similar issue between .308 Winchester and 7.62X51mm.  The .308 is a hotter load and the headspace is different from that of the 7.62.  So while they look identical and people will say you can use them interchangeably, they’re different rounds. Generally speaking, you can safely shoot 7.62mm in a .308 rifle, but you’re taking a risk going in the other direction. These three examples aren’t the only ones out there. Like with the .357 magnum example above, you can shoot .44 Special (I bet you didn’t even know there was a .44 Special, huh?  Learn something new every day) in a .44 Magnum, but not the other way around. Taurus straight up advertises that you can shoot a .45 Long Colt or a .410 shotgun shell in their Taurus Judge.  It’s just a matter of knowing what you can fire from your weapon safely. Old M1895 Nagant revolvers can supposedly shoot .32S&W, .32S&W Long and .32H&R Magnum rounds, but it’s not safe, and I’m telling you right now you shouldn’t do it. Mosin Nagant revovler…widely thought to be the worst revolver ever adopted by a military force Like a lot of things with firearms, it all comes down to safety.  When in doubt, use the ammunition that’s stamped on the firearm.  But it’s nice to know that there are other options out there. Want to learn more about calibers and bullet types?  Check out our Common Calibers Guide . Know of some other firearms that can shoot two different cartridges? Tell us about them in the comments! Any other questions…we cover almost everything in our Beginner’s Guide to Guns .

AR-15 Scopes and Optics

AR-15 Scopes and Optics

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cbc84c41_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cbc84c41_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } AR-15 scopes are pretty simple; after all, you're just picking a scope for a rifle. Of course in the defensive, law-enforcement or military context, durability becomes much more important than in hunting. Red-Dot Scopes The Aimpoint with the twist-off 3X adapter, being used to slam LaRue targets far downrange. The beginning of red-dot scopes in practical competition began with Jerry Barnhart in 1990. He mounted an Aimpoint on a .38 Super Open gun and proceeded to win the Nationals with it. Later that year, Doug Koenig, having mounted a red-dot scope on his Open gun, won the World Shoot. After that, there was no going back. Well, at least not for a few years. The original scopes were dim, had narrow tubes and were quite fragile. It was not unheard of for a competitor to have two or three pre-zeroed scopes in their gear bag. Should one decide to break, they’d unbolt the old one and install the new one. I recall one time, at a USPSA Nationals, after a hard rain the sun came out. My extensively-modified and unsealed scope fogged up. By holding a butane lighter flame against it, I was able to dry it out. We’ve come a long way since then, and Aimpoint has done a lot to advance the field. Related GunDigest Articles New Optics: Night Optics SVTS Thermal Night Vision Scopes AR-15 Optics: Red Dots First Look: New Burris Optics for 2016 The method of operation of any red-dot scope is the same: you look through it, at the target. For fast, close-in shooting, you simply let the dot “float” in your field of view. Where it is, is where you hit. Optical purists quibble about which red-dots are and are not perfectly parallax-free. Parallax is the change in point of impact from the dot (or crosshairs) of a scope, when you move the dot or crosshairs from the optical center of the scope by moving your head. A scope with parallax will have the point of impact away from the dot or crosshairs when they are near the edge of the field of view. In a magnifying optic, parallax can be a problem. Optically, the magnifying scope can be adjusted so it is parallax-free at a single distance. However, the effect is so small at distance that scopes can be said to be “parallax-free” at or beyond a certain distance when properly adjusted. Target competitors fuss over it greatly. A scope adjusted to be parallax-free at fifty yards will show parallax at 100, and vice-versa. When a change of fractions of an inch can mean lost points and lost matches, target shooters get fussy. The lack of magnification and the large dot size means that even a red-dot optic that is not well-engineered and has parallax hardly matters.

Book Review: Air Rifles: A Buyers and Shooters Guide

Book Review: Air Rifles: A Buyers and Shooters Guide

I’ll say from the outset that I’m less familiar with air guns than “traditional” guns. Air rifles , to me, have always fallen into the category of a BB gun, the “ Red Rider ” type that Ralphie wished for in the classic movie, A Christmas Story . A “rifle” that kids use as a precursor to getting a rimfire rifle, something they can use to understand the principles of gun safety while knocking soda cans over with an air-powered BB.  This book, along with some independent research, shattered my preconceptions of the air rifle . As it turns out, the air rifle has a rich history and a variety of applications. As much as it hurts to admit, the air rifle may be a valuable tool in skirting gun control laws.  As bleak as it may sound, plinking around with an air rifle may be the only option in the future. In any event, let’s dispense with the gloom and doom and get into the world of air rifles. Exploring the details of miscellaneous weapons types is always fun.  It’s even more fun when it brings you back to the days of plinking around the backyard as a kid. Quick Navigation Overview Likes & Dislikes The Verdict Overview The modern air rifle, in case you’re unaware, is vastly different from its predecessor. The first air rifle, it seems, dates back to around 1580 and now sits in a museum in Stockholm .  After a bit of cursory research, I learned early, advanced air rifles were used for hunting wild boar and deer.  Of course, these rifles were a bit more hardcore than your traditional BB Gun.  In fact, old air rifles were used in military applications as well.  Today’s more modern air rifle can do just that in a survival situation.  And with what seems like ever-increasing risks of additional gun control measures and expensive ammunition, the air rifle makes sense to add to anyone’s collection of survival firearms.   The book covers air rifles from start to finish. All types are covered: CO2 powered guns, spring guns, multi-pump pneumatics, single-stroke pneumatics, and pre-charged pneumatics. The book then moves into the many types of projectiles (more than a novice might think).  For preppers, there’s even an entire chapter devoted to “The Survival Springer”.  These include models of all types and price ranges.  The book also covers sights, scopes, velocity, accuracy, range, targets, training tips, and accessories. Truly, this book seems to cover everything on air rifles. Related: Back to Basics – Rifle Accuracy After reading “ Air Rifles: A Buyers and Shooter's Guide ” by Steve Markwith, I’m much more familiar with the versatility of the air rifle and have a newfound respect for them. I’m even itching to buy one (or two) now.  The modern air rifle could serve as an excellent, low-cost training tool for people that live in more suburban environments where shooting bullets off your back deck is less of a… neighborly thing to do. Likes & Dislikes Rich in photos and description, Markwith’s conversational yet informative writing style from his Survival Guns - A Beginner's Guide holds true here, too. This should be a go-to book for, as the title suggests, anyone thinking about buying an air rifle or anyone that shoots one. I don’t care if you’re a beginner or an expert air rifleman, there’s something in this book that will help. Also Read: The Evolution of the Black Rifle My biggest complaint is that, like Survival Guns , the images are informative but are presented in black and white. The book would be richer if they were in color. The writing is better than the image presentation. $12.95 seems fair for the paperback, but $7.95 for a Kindle version feels a bit high. I generally prefer paperback anyway, particularly where this one is in 8×10” size, but Kindle buyers should be able to get this book for something more like $5.95. The Verdict If you’re new to air rifles , or are even a moderate user, there’s something of use for you here, I’m certain of it. This book would, however, best serve the individual that’s thinking about getting an air rifle, because the money spent on the book up front would save you money many times over by both helping you choose the right air rifle to suit your needs from the outset, and also help you get the most out of it. Photos by: Christmas Story Prepper Press Other interesting articles: Book Review: The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse Quick Buyer’s Guide to Imported AK Market Book Review: Boston’s Gun Bible LDS Preparedness Manual: Book Review for 2020

Browning Unveils Cynergy Classic Trap Unsingle Combo

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cc67fea8_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cc67fea8_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The Browning Cynergy Classic Trap Unsingle Combo is the latest addition to the company's line of high-performance trap shotguns. It’s designed to give trap shooters one of the most advanced over-and-under designs for singles or doubles competition. The "Cynergy Classic Trap" Unsingle Combo set includes an adjustable Unsingle Rib with a single barrel and over-and-under barrel set, all in an aluminum case. The Unsingle Rib can be fine tuned for sight-picture and point-of-impact adjustments. The Cynergy’s Monolock hinge technology gives it the lowest-profile receiver in the industry, which helps control recoil. The hinge system pivots on significantly more surface area than other over-and-under shotguns with low-profile receivers. Related GunDigest Articles Browning Introduces the Scaled Down Cynergy Micro Midas Classic Guns: Browning Superposed Over/Under 10 Classic Shotguns You've Got to Own The Cynergy Classic Trap Unsingle Combo has a gloss-finish Monte Carlo grade III/IV walnut stock with right-hand palm swell, adjustable comb and modified semi-beavertail forearm with finger grooves. It will be offered in several barrel combinations with HiViz Pro-Comp fiber-optic sights and four Invector Plus Midas Grade chokes tubes.

Market Trends: Intensive Bidding on Classic Guns at RIA

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d3439796_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d3439796_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Pat Hogan — Rock Island Auction Co. , Rock Island, Ill. At its most recent 2015 auction for firearms and related items, Rock Island Auctions (RIA) sold over 7,000 items, on over 20,000 sealed bids plus another 3,700 phone bids, for an auction total of $5.6 million in sales, noted owner Pat Hogan. Related GunDigest Articles Market Trends: Top Dollar for M1 Garands Market Trends: Solid Prices for Collectible Rimfire Guns Market Trends: Hoosiers Snap Up CCW Training, Handguns One of the auction’s surprises was the intense back-and-forth bidding for a gold — finished Auto Ordnance Corp Thompson Model 1927 A1 semi-automatic rifle that came with its own drum mag and “violin” case. A phone bidder and an Internet bidder duked it out, with the Internet bidder taking the Thompson for $5,175.

Summary

Qore Performance, inventors of the IcePlate hard cell cooling and hydration solution, is proud to announce the release of the Enhanced Dealer Program in partnership with SOARescue who is now the Subject Matter Expert for all Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications for the IcePlate. In this role, SOARescue will be spearheading the already rapid growth of IcePlate into Fire/Rescue, EMS and Tactical EMS applications where end users are in need of a powerful, portable rehab solution. The expansion of IcePlate applications beyond military and law enforcement has been a vision of SOARescue for some time.